How many brands of bike have you owned?

Discussion in 'New Models' started by trev, Aug 12, 2010.

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How many brands of bikes have you owned?

  1. 1 brand

    3.4%
  2. 2 brands

    14.9%
  3. 3 brands

    26.4%
  4. 4 brands

    17.2%
  5. 5 brands

    11.5%
  6. 6 brands

    10.3%
  7. 7 brands

    5.7%
  8. 8 brands

    6.9%
  9. 9 brands

    2.3%
  10. 10 brands

    1.1%
  1. Graham Allardice

    Graham Allardice New Member

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    faffi

    The Deauville is a bike I've always admired. Agreed that for more than short rides some wind protection is highly desirable. How about posting a photo of yours?

    After a lifetime riding big bikes my 82 year old riding mate recently bought a Suzuki Inazuma 25 twin and fitted it with Puig Street Screen and what an amazingly effective screen it is. In the 90s he had a Honda Pacific Coast. Now that has to be one of the all-comers most comfortable bike with perfect wind protection and a superb seat.

    After a lot of experimentation over the years I've found that the ideal position for the top of a screen is level with the tip of your nose and no more than 30cm from your visor. 25cm is even better if it can be achieved.

    Currently I'm riding a 2007 Buell XB12Ss with a Givi A620 screen and a top addition I made. The protection that and hand guard additions gives is definitely top shelf. I know that Buells are not meant to look like that but I like it. Actually I love the bike for many reasons and have had it since new.

    With screen top addition 22 Sept 2012.jpg
     
  2. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    Cool - a Buell actually outfitted to proper use, not just for posing :)

    If I'm lucky, my bike will show up below:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Graham Allardice

    Graham Allardice New Member

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    faffi

    I think your bike looks really great. Top photos too. Snow in Australia - must be in the Snowy Mountains? Interesting screen. Are the holes effective in sending air up inside the screen? The black side deflectors look like a good idea too. Is the lower fairing after-market? Do you tour on the bike? For a 20 year old bike it looks immaculate. Well done.

    My Buell comes alive at highway speeds. Below about 70km/h it's not an easy ride because it needs to be kept over 2,500 rpm to be smooth. Over 93,000km on it now. All trouble free. The luggage frame is home made and takes Givi panniers and topboxes. Cruising at highway speeds can see 23 or 24km/l, which has always amazed me because it's about the same as my mates get on their 650 V-Stroms.
     
  4. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    I live and ride in Norway :D No lack of snow :(

    The screen was sold by Honda as original replacement for the low, stock screen, and works very well. Little noise and turbulence behind the screen, and great weather protection. Miles better than the stock version, which is noisy and turbulent and almost as cold as no fairing in winter time.

    I have not toured on it yet, if by touring you mean multiple days, but I have done many 300 km days on it. I like it a lot, but have only owned it since last fall, so somebody else must get credit for maintaining the bike so well. Most Deauvilles look like crap, this one stands out.

    26 km/l is the best I have seen, ridden gently, and 20 km/l the worst, cruising at 110+ against very heavy winds. For a 240kg touring bike dating back 20 years and running carbs, I find that very good - which much also be said for your big bruiser!
     
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  5. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    BTW, do you have some more detailed pictures of the rack you made?

    Also forgot to mention that I have had - and ridden - several twins, and quite often they need too much revs to run smooth. My brother's Aprilia 1000 CapoNord needed closer to 4000 rpm in top gear to stop chopping at the chain, or about 110 kph. Even in the lower gears, it needed more than 3 k rpm. For me, that takes away much of the joy. 2500 for an old Harley tuned as high as it is in your Buell is quite respectable IMO.

    Before the Deauville, I had a 1982 Virago 750 with an 1100 engine - the bike was transformed into a scrambler. That engine was fantastic for a twin, and would accelerate from 40 kph in top gear up an 8% hill without issue if I was gently with the throttle. On level ground, I could take it down to 1000 rpm in top. From 60 kph (about 2000 rpm, or just under) it would accelerate smoothly under full throttle in top, even up steep hills. I really liked both the engine and how the bike rode, but when my oldest son took to it like he had ridden every day for a decade - instead of wobbling insecurely on the 1977 Z650 I handed him earlier - I decided to hand it over to him; it is so much nice to ride together when he has confidence and can keep up a decent pace.
     
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  6. Graham Allardice

    Graham Allardice New Member

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    faffi

    Norway! Lovely to be chatting with someone so far from New Zealand. The Internet has certainly annihilated distance.

    I've not had much to do with large capacity V-twins before my Buell so your comments are interesting. The Buell is pulling very strongly at 2,000rpm or even less but it's unpleasant to ride there. By 2,500rpm it's smoothed nicely but now has so much torque that care is needed on imperfect surfaces. Traction control would cure that but not an option of course. As compensation it throttles very smoothly and predictably and the twistgrip feels directly connected to the rear tyre contact patch. None of the jerkiness which even the best chain drives give.

    I will take a photo of the Buell's luggage frame and post it here.

    The Suzuki 650 V-twin engine is amazingly tractable and smooth. I wish all V-twins were as pleasant.

    Is the Deauville V-twin engine smooth? The 800 V-twin in the Pacific Coast is the smoothest I've experienced. So smooth that there is a constant risk of revving it into the red zone!

    Because of arthritis I also have a bike with DCT transmission so my left hand doesn't get sore from clutch use. It's a Honda NC750SD. But for arthritis it's not a bike I'd have considered owning but I've come to like it quite well.

    Most of my riding nowadays comprises of day-rides with 3 to 7 mates of between 250 and 450km and cruising at 110 to 120km/h.
     
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  7. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    My dad always said that if he couldn't live in Norway for whatever reason, he'd live in New Zealand. Having visited your islands several times as a sailor, he said that the people were pretty similar to us here, and that the climate was also not terribly unlike what we have here in the south of Norway. Basically, he had only good things to say about New Zealand.

    BTW, member lindsaymac has a KTM V-twin, and it also needs its revs to run smoothly. As you have noticed on your own bike, there is power at low revs, but they jerk awfully at the chain (or shaft) when asked to perform below their comfort zone. Not healthy for anything on the bike. But since I am no fan of revs when I cruise - fanging is OK with revs - I dislike having to run lower gears just for an engine to be smooth. My favourite engine is the MT-01, which turns about 2200 rpm at 100 kph, yet pulls fairly smoothly from 60 in top.

    The PC800 was smooth due to its engine layout that tricks it into thinking it's a 90-degree twin with perfect primary balance. Unfortunately, this also cause it to have secondary vibrations in the form of rocking couple, which can be felt. Unless the engine is fully rubber mounted, as that of the PC800.

    The Deauville, designated NT650V, engine is a different design, but built around the same principle as the PC800, but without rubber mounts. The engine is fairly smooth, but you can certainly feel it's running. Especially between 2400 and 2900 rpm under load, it protests a bit, but is happy below or above in any gear. It's a lazy engine, with only 57 hp, but considering the weight and the tall gearing - 4200 rpm @ a true 100 kph - it goes pretty well and you rarely have to shift down for hills or headwinds.

    Anyway, it is very different to my former Yamaha MT-07, which was a rocket ship. That bike now belongs to my youngest son. The Honda and the Yamaha twins vibrate about the same, I would say, but feel different; the Yamaha is always eager, the Honda reluctant. But actual performance on the road is closer than one would expect considering that the Honda is 60 kg heavier and make about 20 hp less. Part of that is down to the MT feeling faster than it is, the NT feeling slower than it is.

    Arthritis is the pits and mostly comes from humans living way longer than we were designed for. I'm all for living longer, but could do without the wear and tear that follows. I'm a pup at 55, but having suffered more than 50 broken bones plus a number of self afflicted injuries when training, and I do notice it every day. Not too bad, but riding a bike for several hours tend to make itself felt particularly in the knees, but also hands, neck, back and hips can join in at any time :rolleyes: That's why I place comfort high on my want list when going for a bike to buy.

    I can easily understand why you enjoy your Honda 750, which I believe is rather relaxing and not unlike the Deauville in that respect. In fact, the NT700/750 is the most popular owners turn to when they want a new bike now that Honda has stopped making Deauvilles. I have not heard a single owner regret buying the sensible twin.

    Better stop now before I write a book :oops:
     
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  8. Graham Allardice

    Graham Allardice New Member

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    An interesting post, thanks. All good stuff in there. Are you Norwegian? If so your English is excellent.
    Oh, to be only 55 again. Pain reminds us that we're still alive! My memory is clearly failing though, because the Buell is not my first big V-twin. A Guzzi V11 Sport and Guzzi Breva V1100 are two and a smaller Honda VT500 as well.

    I will photograph the Buell's pannier frame today.
     
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  9. Graham Allardice

    Graham Allardice New Member

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    This is my Honda NC750SD. Now fitted with Givi topbox and mount. As with many of my bikes it has had a professional suspension upgrade to get better compliance for improved comfort. On this bike there is a Nitron rear unit with a remote compression adjuster. The forks also have been seriously modified but stopping short of fitting cartridge damping. Puig screen. Fancy seat. Pretty comfortable but also pretty gutless compared with my Buell. Side view Feb 2018 for forum use.jpg
     
  10. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    Yes, I am Norwegian, so thank you for the compliment. Learned some English at school, then found the Internet in 1996 and, thanks to Sir Spell Checker, began to expand on my vocabulary and typing.

    How did you like the Guzzis? My brother has always been a fan of motorcycles from England as well as Guzzis, and currently own a fuel injected Cali 1100. It's the only Guzzi I have ridden that actually handles like a normal machine, and then engine is way smoother than other Guzzis I've ridden, but that is about the end of what I like. The gearbox is a nightmare, the seating position utterly cramped and the saddle too short for two. Cannot get to grips with the linked brakes, either. However, the Breva and Sport should be better in most respects, I imagine?

    BTW, I used to own a VT500FT Ascot. The Deauville engine is directly based on the old VT500. I fitted very long Koni rear shocks intended for a VF1100 Magna and Progressive fork springs with extra preload in order to get some wanted cornering clearance. Don't understand why the American press said that the bike could barely be scraped at all with the stock items, because I found it to be average. Once raised, though, I could lean until there were hints of contact with the tarmac on the tyre sidewalls where the thread ended. Bike was great on gravel roads as well.

    I put a Nitron fully adjustable shock on the MT07, but found it less compliant than I prefer. Basically, I do not want to feel the road. At all. The Nitron, along with the Cogent DDC valves I fitted to the forks, telegraphed every single pebble on the road directly to me. But ridden hard, especially on a taxing road with broken tarmac or bumps, things began to work very well indeed.

    The Deauville needs better suspension also. It is both too soft and too harsh. Reminds me of my former Volvo S40; ignoring minor ripples and bottoming over the large stuff. And there is a lack of damping in the Honda, just as with the Volvo. Which I find strange, because usually little damping gives compliance but little control. So how do they lack both? The Honda fork is like that; under-sprung and under-damped and rarely comfy and often over-taxed. I'll try stiffer springs and heavier oil first, but it will likely not be very satisfying. The shock is borderline acceptable.

    Sorry for calling your NC an NT! Of course it will feel tame compared to the Buell, but does the engine feel strained or lame or happy when riding? I had a Z1300 DFI that went very fast, but felt very gutless. And I had an XL500S that felt strong and happy even with the throttle pinned to the stop, at which point it was barely doing 130 kph. I prefer the latter, as high speed is rarely used in this country, but a happy (for lack of a better word) engine can be enjoyed constantly.

    Oh, dear, here I am rambling again....
     
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