How many brands of bike have you owned?

Discussion in 'New Models' started by trev, Aug 12, 2010.

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How many brands of bikes have you owned?

  1. 1 brand

    3.4%
  2. 2 brands

    14.9%
  3. 3 brands

    26.4%
  4. 4 brands

    17.2%
  5. 5 brands

    11.5%
  6. 6 brands

    10.3%
  7. 7 brands

    5.7%
  8. 8 brands

    6.9%
  9. 9 brands

    2.3%
  10. 10 brands

    1.1%
  1. Graham Allardice

    Graham Allardice New Member

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    faffi
    Here is the luggage frame for my Buell.

    The start point was to use a pair of basic Givi side frames with all the attachment parts to the bike and the support for the topbox being custom made. I use Givi E21 top-loading Monokey panniers and a variety of Givi Monolock topboxes.

    Top loading panniers are much easier to live with than side loaders and never leak.

    The hooks at the rear are used for hanging the fuel cap during refueling and for hanging helmets during stops.

    This photo also shows the extended stock hugger and the home made rear mudguard extension.

    The tail/stop light is a large round LED unit made for trailers.

    Buell luggage frame.jpg
     
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  2. Graham Allardice

    Graham Allardice New Member

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    faffi

    Great last post, thanks. You can be proud of your English, especially as it isn't your mother tongue. I know some French from school days and managed OK when visiting France but there is little use for French here.

    I enjoyed my two Guzzis well enough and would have another happily enough. Both were very different from the Cali. I used to say that when I'm old I will get a Guzzi V750. At 78 I'm not old enough yet.

    The NC750SD. Bought only to get an automatic bike without a clutch lever and gear lever because of arthritis. With a Shad seat and other comfort additions it is reasonably comfortable. Like your Deauville it has the Nitron shock and DDC fork valves but the whole lot were seriously modified by the suspension expert. The rear is good, the front not so much. By contrast the Buell is superbly compliant. Done by the same suspension firm but with much better forks as the starting point. The NC is overall more comfortable but a rather cold bike to ride. The Buell gets far too hot in Summer but is lovely just now. 9C here today. I seldom need to ride in lower than 5C and ride all year round. The NC could do with a much stronger front brake. I tend to ride it in manual mode using the up/down finger/thumb buttons. I guess it has enough power and the torque is surprisingly good. It is smooth enough and is ridiculously fuel efficient, with 30km/l being common.

    Both my bikes show 3,000rpm at 100km/h!

    When buying the Buell in 2007 it was a toss up between it and an MT01. The MT was a lot more expensive and a lot heavier so the Buell won.
     
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  3. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    I see you have not lost your fabricating skills! Nice work on the rack and fender extender - looks factory!!

    By the Guzzi V750, do you mean the current V7-series, or the old original ones? I dig the look of the recent V7, especially the first edition with the Breva engine. Until you place a fully grown person on one. Then it looks too small. In that respect, the 750S3 is much nicer. At least in my eyes ;)

    I'm impressed that the NC can do with only 3000 rpm at 100 kph, though - that is less than my Intruder 1400 turned, which was 3200 rpm if memory serves. My Deauville turns 4200, and I thought that was pretty low considering the power output and weight. It is also about 10% less than the SV650.

    Interesting that you considered the MT01, although it is easy to understand why you went Buell.

    We have winters here with next to no snow and rarely temps below zero, but we also have winters with up to 100 days with the white stuff.
     
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  4. Graham Allardice

    Graham Allardice New Member

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    Yes I mean the V7 range.

    The NC is promoted as a modest power/good torque engine with great fuel economy and it delivers those things as promised. The 'frunk' storage compartment is a good point too. Excellent mirrors. Inadequate front brake. Poor seat until replaced by a Shad aftermarket one. The stock screen also doesn't do much but there are many aftermarket ones available. These bikes are uncommon here but obviously that is not the case in Europe because there are many aftermarket accessories available. Steering is neutral but the stock suspension is poor.

    The Buell is a very easy bike to live with. Belt drive. Hydraulic valve adjusters. Needs a bit of oil added between changes and has done since new. Maybe half a litre in 8,000km. Mine is stock power-unit-wise except for airbox modifications mainly to stop breather oil building up in there. Many owners fit remote breather catch-cans but my mod makes that unnecessary.

    The Guzzi V11 Sport was a pretty bike and did it's job well. Mostly. it could get a bad rear-end weave going if it hit bumps when banked over at over 150km/h. Mine was a 2001 model. Later ones had reinforced lower frames and were fine.

    The Breva V1100 was a much better bike overall. Quite a charmer I thought. The bike has its summer screen on in the photo. My Guzzi engines disappointed me with the way they needed revs to be smooth. At least 120km/h before being happy it top gear. Current ones may be better but I've not ridden any.
    Me on the Breva.jpg
     
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  5. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    Thank you for the reports on the bikes :)

    The NC sell like hotcakes in Germany, at least, but are not as popular here in Norway. At the moment there are 9 NC700/750s for sale in this country. I've seen reports of them delivering more than 30 km/l on average. and that they can be coaxed into as much as 40 km/l if speed is kept down.

    Strange that you felt the need to go that fast before your 1100s would operate smoothly, because the Cali of my brother (same engine, milder state of tune) runs fine from 70 kph in top also under high load.

    Not sure how old that picture on the Breva is, but would estimate you're about 70 there? You look fit for your age!
     
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  6. Graham Allardice

    Graham Allardice New Member

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    Yes, about 70 then. My GP reckons I'm a very young 78 year old. Fool! If I am fairly so I put it down to walking a lot and riding motorcycles. Apparently we're never old in our dreams and I think that's true while riding too. Riding doesn't include mounting and dismounting though - I'm fine with the Buell but climb onto the NC via the left footrest. Most new bikes are too tall for me to swing a leg over now even though I'm 175cm tall. Worn hip joints! Buell XB12Ss and new riding gear.jpg
     
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  7. faffi

    faffi A.S.A.N.

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    Hip pains can be really limiting. I suffered from it a couple of years back, and like you, had issues climbing onto bikes. But I know it wasn't mechanical, although it felt like it, so I began doing exercises to strengthen weak parts and to align the hips, and now hardly notice I have hips at all.
     
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